2020 GWF Annual Science Meeting


The Global Water Futures Annual Open Science Meeting was held in a virtual format this year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. NWF researchers created posters featuring a range of research topics including groundwater discharge, greenhouse gas fluxes, and plant community responses to permafrost thaw.

L-Band response to freeze/thaw in a boreal forest stand from ground- and tower-based radiometer observations


NWF researchers Oliver Sonnentag, Mariam El-Amine, and Christoforos Pappas were involved in a recent RSE paper, which highlights: Two L-Band radiometers that were deployed at a boreal forest site The relationship between tree permittivity and tree temperature under freezing conditions Vegetation optical depth was correlated to tree permittivity L-Brand TB freeze-up signal in the fall … Continue reading L-Band response to freeze/thaw in a boreal forest stand from ground- and tower-based radiometer observations

Updates on Northern Water Futures’ Technical Workshops


By: Jennifer Baltzer (Project Lead) Over the last several months, the Northern Water Futures team has been busy collaboratively leading several research workshops in the Northwest Territories. These workshops focused on ecological forecasting, wildfire impacts, and permafrost mapping. The workshops were held collaboratively with the Government of the Northwest Territories. Ecological forecasting modeling workshop: In … Continue reading Updates on Northern Water Futures’ Technical Workshops

Studying Wildfire May Require Swimming in Bogs


By: Jessica McCuaig The Northwest Territories had the largest fire season in its history in 2014, when 2.85 million hectares of forested lands were impacted by wildfires. It is anticipated that the long and intense 2014 fire season will have long-term impacts for the communities and ecosystems in the NWT, some of which are hard … Continue reading Studying Wildfire May Require Swimming in Bogs

Northwest Territories Thermokarst Mapping Collective


By: Tristan Gingras-Hill Permafrost thaw is a primary cause of climate-driven landscape change in the north and has a major effect on ecosystems and infrastructure. Understanding the distribution of thaw-sensitive terrain is critical to predicting the future state of the environment and water resources of the Northwest Territories’ (NWT), and for planning community and infrastructure … Continue reading Northwest Territories Thermokarst Mapping Collective